Collecting Judgments

COLLECT FROM A LICENSED CONTRACTOR

TO COLLECT FROM A CONTRACTOR

I know a great contractor named Andy Reed. I know firsthand that he and his company, ATR Solutions, http://atrsolutionsinc.com do a great job for their clients. If you need a contractor, I would highly recommend him. However, that's not always the case with contractors. Check out Adam Carolla's show http://www.spike.com/shows/catch-a-contractor to see some examples. When things go bad and you obtain a judgment against a licensed contractor, the law provides some leverage. A judgment against a contractor which is construction-related (the law gives a very broad definition of construction related) that is not paid within 90 days can result in the contractor's license being suspended pursuant to Business and Professions Code §7071.17. Suspension of a contractor means that the contractor can't work legally.

Contact my office today if you have a judgment against a licensed contractor.

THE POWER OF CONTEMPT TO ENFORCE JUDGMENTS

Can you go to jail for unpaid debt? Behind bars for skipping out on your bills? Technically, imprisonment for unpaid debt is unconstitutional.  In fact, the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act specifically prohibits debt collectors from threatening seizure of property or imprisionment on civil matters unless the ability to take such action is lawful and the creditor intends to take such action.

Because, just like life, with the Constitution and laws, there are caveats, and one or more of those may be the reason you, or someone you know, ended up locked behind bars.  

From employers refusing to pay employees to "deadbeat dads" skipping out on child support, the court has held that these individuals are in contempt of court and thus imprisoned for failing to pay debts.